Monthly Archives: June 2017

A quick look at the axitinib data and IO/VEGF inhibitor combos

Yes I know, there has been a lot of talk of immunotherapy combination trials (and tribulations). But in reviewing #ASCO17 slides I stumbled on some interesting results. (These are screen grabs actually and I don’t have a source for all the photos – my apologies to the folks that posted these pics!)

What looked interesting at ASCO? Lots of cool stories emerged, but I think this one was overlooked:

This slide grabbed my attention- this is a summary of data on PD-(L)-1 inhibitors combined with targeted inhibitors in advanced renal cell carcinoma (RCC). I’ve tagged some of the drugs just below the slide:

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The studies shown in the graph can be a little misleading, as the monotherapy studies are in the second-line or later setting, while the combination data are in the first line (treatment-naive) setting. For example the nivolumab result is from the CheckMate 025 trial vs. everolimus (an mTOR inhibitor from Novartis) in patients with advanced RCC for who had relapsed previous treatment with one or two regimens of antiangiogenic (i.e. anti-VEGF) therapy (Motzer et al 2013: http://www.nejm.org/doi/pdf/10.1056/NEJMoa1510665). Just to note in passing, nivolumab therapy in this setting triggered an overall response rate (ORR) of 25% of patients, and had a modest but significant impact on progression free survival (PFS) and median overall survival (mOS). Indeed, 30% of the nivolumab patients that responded were alive 5 years later, as reported at ASCO last year (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/record/122769/abstract).

The atezolizumab plus bevacizumab data come from the IMmotion 150 trial was presented at the ASCO GU meeting in February 2017 (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/record/140798/abstract). In that study the combination was compared to atezolizumab alone or sunitinib alone, in treatment-naive (frontline) patients. The combination produced an ORR = 32%, just a bit better that atezolizumab alone (26%) or sunitinib alone (29%) but there was a significant impact on PFS at 12 months particularly in patients having PD-L1+ tumors. Overall, patients achieved a median PFS of 11.7 months with the combination, 8.4 months with sunitinib, and 6.1 months with single-agent atezolizumab. PD-L1-positive tumors yielded a median PFS of 14.7 months with the combination, 7.8 months with sunitinib, and 5.5 months with atezolizumab monotherapy.  There was no improvement in the hazard ratio (a statistic that measures the chance of patient death in different cohorts in the trial, as compared to each other – arm vs arm).

Against that promising, if early, backdrop, the very interesting results here are shown wide right on the graph above – the combination of axitinib, a pan-VEGF-receptor inhibitor, with avelumab (anti-PD-L1, EMD Serona/Pfizer) and pembrolizumab (anti-PD-1, Merck). These studies are ongoing in the front-line setting. The overall response rate of axitinib with pembrolizumab of 67% is startlingly high, although these data are from a small study (I can’t find pembrolizumab or avelumab monotherapy data as a comparison, but the atezolizumab  monotherapy responses at 26% in the IMmotion 150 trial gives us a baseline for anti-PD-(L)-1 monotherapy in the frontline setting).

Axitinib is a second generation VEGF-R inhibitor with improved selectivity over earlier compounds, and also over some competing compounds (e.g. pazopanib from Novartis). Axitinib monotherapy in second line RCC produces an ORR around 40%, perhaps a little higher, with a modest impact on PFS when compared to sorafenib (~ 5 months v 3 months ). In the first line setting the monotherapy data are a bit better, with ORR reported at 50%+ and PFS of about a year, with a median overall survival (mOS) of about 2 years (similar to other VEGF inhibitors).

In that context an ORR of 55% (axitinib plus avelumab) or 67% (axitinib plus penbrolizumab) might be just additive (approximately 50% (axitinib) + 25% (anti-PD-(L)-1)). But then I came across this screen grab from the avelumab combo study:

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Notice here that the X-axis is in weeks, and so we have ongoing responses of greater than 1 year (52 weeks) in 14/32 patients (44%) and, as noted on the slide, a total of 24/32 patients (75%) with an ongoing response with a minimum of 24 weeks. Of interest, partial responses (PR, red triangles) evolved into complete responses (CR, blue triangles) over time, suggesting an ongoing immune response. Durability of response is critical here, but it certainly looks like this cohort will handsomely beat the 2 year mOS mark, which will best axitinib alone. The avelumab plus axitinib study (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/record/144685/abstract) and the pembrolizumab plus axitinib study (https://jitc.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/2051-1426-3-S2-P353) certainly make the case for this particular combination (with axitinib); in contrast the combination of pembrolizumab with another kinase inhibitor pazopanib (that blocks VEGFR-2, KIT and PDGFR-β)  resulted in intolerable liver toxicity (http://meetinglibrary.asco.org/record/152938/abstract).

Ok so why is this important? I think there are a few interesting themes here. 1st, the combination of anti-PD-(L)-1 antibodies with standard of care (SOC) treatment, in this case, axitinib, has produce a result that dwarves what we see with epacadostat, the IDO inhibitor that would be expected to aid in blocking tumor immunosuppression. That is not to say that the epacadostat combination will not bring real benefit (again, it’s the durability plus the response that counts). It may very well do so, and it may do so with less toxicity (we’ve not discussed adverse events, which can be a differentiating feature).  However, the concept that pairing immune checkpoint inhibitors would unleash the anti-tumor immune response to bring synergistic activity is not robustly supported in this indication (not yet anyway).

That brings up the second interesting point, which is: against an ORR of 55% (using the avelumab plus axitinib data), how should we judge novel agents? If this is ‘noise’ arising from combination with SOC, how will novel agents overcome this and show a positive signal? The answer, simply, is in randomized, controlled trials (RCTs). Dr James Mule made this point at our IO combinations panel at the Sach’s pre-ASCO conference, and he used this slide from Lerrink to show how few immunotherapy combination studies are randomized (h/t to Dr Mule and to Lerrink):

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So despite the need for RCTs, we don’t see many yet. Another tactic maybe to drive a biomarker forward alongside a novel agent, in order to be able to select patients and differentiate in that manner. Easier said then done, but a possibility. The magnitude of potential noise is illustrated in this graph from EvaluatePharma’s nice IO combo report:

Screen Shot 2017-06-11 at 12.20.41 PMTheir report uncovered 765 immunotherapy combo trials across every conceivable indication. That is a lot of data to sift through.

Ok, the 3rd point. What I love about this example (renal cell cancer) is the focus on biology. Note here that we’ve not tried to be comprehensive about the RCC field, the treatment landscape, other novel targeted agents in development, the oncogenic drivers, the mutation burden, the tumor microenvironment, or the microbiome (all of these rooks will come home to roost in time).  Instead we focused on two classes of therapeutics that are playing well together – anti-angiogenic drugs (anti-VEGF, VEGFR inhibitors) and anti-PD-(L)-1 antibodies. That’s all. But this gives us a new way to think about the treatment and competitive landscape in immunotherapy – specifically, how are companies building on this early data.

To look at this I used an IO combo database that I’m beta-testing for Beacon-Intelligence, and an interesting theme emerged. So, a quick share (this is a quick look and again, not a comprehensive one by me: one can quickly find more studies in the database or online)

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So, not suprisingly, Roche/Genentech has a slew a trials designed to pair it’s anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab with atezolizumab plus SOC in a range of indications including RCC.  What is a bit surprising is the appearance of Eli Lilly, bringing along it’s own anti-PD-L1 (LY3300054). While Lilly is not really considered an immunotherapy player, it does have some keen assets to deploy: anti-VEGFR2 antibody (ramacirumab) and, although not shown here, the multi-kinase inhibitor galunisertib that potently inhibits TGFBR1. The VEGF and TGFbeta pathways are intricately intertwined and both have profound impact on tumor biology, stromal biology, and immune biology. From a biology perspective, Lilly suddenly looks like an immunotherapy player in the making. Here I think is an interesting lesson, that is, follow the biology, not the molecule (btw, a search on TGFbeta combination therapy leads down another rabbit hole, best saved for later).

stay tuned